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The Crooked Jades
When The Chicago Tribune confirmed that The Crooked Jades were winning fans across the normal age divide, they nailed it. The band, they said, made music that “might appeal as much to the pierced generation as to their great-grandparents.”

The five-piece, from San Francisco, have been on a mission to reinvent old-time music, pushing boundaries and blurring categories with their beguiling, soulful goosebump-inducing performances, driving dance tunes and haunting ballads.

It was long before Oh, Brother, Where Art Thou? created a new interest in old-time mountain music and gospel that the band began digging up and reviving material from the distant past.

You may hear great gems from outfits such as The Skillet Lickers, and no set is complete without a dusting down of the best old tunes that came from the one and only Dock Boggs.

But, although known for a repertoire that is peppered with rare and obscure nuggets, it’s invariably The Jades’ magical original compositions, inspired arrangements and eclectic style, all played on vintage instruments, that mostly win the critics’ praise.

Since starting out back in 1994 when leader/founder Jeff Kazor had a vision to revive the dark and hypnotic sounds of pre-radio music, he and his various accomplished collaborators have gone on to create the distinctive Crooked Jades sound by exploring the roots of Americana and interweaving them with the diverse musical influences of Europe, the Far East and Africa.

A blend of West and East Coast pickers with equal parts attitude and respect, the band performs with a unique energy that has entranced audiences and had reviewers comparing them to everyone from The New Lost City Ramblers and Nick Cave to Tom Waits.

Writing in The Boston Herald, Daniel Gewertz perhaps summed them up as well as any when he observed: "This San Francisco quintet keep true to their old-time string band heart, yet in subtle, weird ways, they exaggerate the slightly-crazed aura of the rural pre-radio era music. It makes for a haunting, sophisticated trip to Appalachia.”
 
       
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